Shenzhen DCH Electronic Co., Ltd.
Main products:plastic,metal,cable assembly
Contact Us
  • Contact Person : Mr. LEUNG Michael
  • Company Name : Shenzhen DCH Electronic Co., Ltd.
  • Tel : 86-0755-29104739
  • Fax : 86-0755-29063493
  • Address : Guangdong,SHENZHEN,(4/F, Bldg. C), Block B, C, D, Jingfu Industrial Park, Hangkong Rd. (W), Gushu, Xixiang, Bao'an District
  • Country/Region : China
  • Zip : 518000

Mobile phone antenna remote shell Prototype design and production assembly plastic injection parts OEM

Mobile phone antenna remote shell Prototype design and production assembly plastic injection parts OEM
Product Detailed
1.Best quality,good price 2.Well-treated surface and excellent equipment 3.Fast & safe delivery time
rvice we provide1.CNC Plastic/Metal Prototypes     (For 1-20 pcs)
2. Vacuum casting/vacuum forming(Silicon Mould) (For 5-150pcs)
3: Low Volume Production      (for 100 to 10,000 parts)
4: Rapid Hardware/Sheet Metal Prototypes  (For 1-500pcs)
5.CNC Aluminum/Brass/Copper/Bronze CNC machining/machined parts (for 1-500pcs)
6.  Automotive and medical equipment Prototypes (for 1-100pcs)
7: SLA/SLS prototype   (for 1-20pcs)
8. Metal Stamping&NCT Stamping
9. 3D Printing
10. Die-casting, hardware machining
11. Electronic Manufacturing Service
12. Injection mould&Plastic Injection
13. Lathing parts
14.  Design service (OEM service)
Certification passed Bureau Veritas,ROHS,ISO
Materials availableABS, POM, PP, PC, PE, PA(Nylon), PA+GF,PPS, PVC,PEI,PBT,PTFE, ABS+GF,ABS+PC,Aluminum, Brass, Copper, brass, and etc. 
Lead time3-5 days  Delivery time:  1-2days to Asia and  American,    2-3days to Europe
Surface treatment availablePolish, transparent surface, translucent surface, painting, rubber oil, Silkscreen... 
brushed, sand spray, anodizing, electroplating…
Preferred Formats:Pro/E, Solidworks, Unigraphics, Catia, Auto CAD, *.igs, *.stp, *.stl, *.x-t
The industry we Service1. Electronics, digital camera , DVD/VCD ,MP3/4 , Coffe oven, hair dryer, and so on
2.Medical devices, BUltrasound scanner case,  Digital Ultrasonic Diagnostic
Imaging case, and etc           
3. Telecommunication products, micro speaker, phone, computer, and etc
4. Autoparts, Auto security & safety products, like dashboard, car lamp, bar, Automobile and motorcycle parts.
5. Household appliance, Rice cooker, Air conditioner, Induction cooker,
 TV, Fanshower and etc.
6. Kitchenwares, Crafts, Perfume bottle, Lighter, Cookie molds,
 glass prototype, and etc  
7. Electronic Video games, Toys, Game handle/controller, Toy plane and etc.  
8. Audio & Video entertainment products, Led products, Computer & mobile products, Electronic organizer & accessories, Intruder alarm & sensor, Measuring & Testing instrument, Wireless devices.
9. And etc…

Dear Customer,

In order to help you get the exact model, please offer the following necessary info.:

1, Order QTY:__________

2, Material:________

3, Surface treatment:__________

4, 2D drawing:_________

5, 3D drawing:_________

6, Any special Requirement:_________

More information, please contact us.

please let us know your interested in, we will accached our quotation.


A prototype is an early sample or model built to test a concept or process or to act as a thing to be replicated or learned from. It is a term used in a variety of contexts, including semantics,design, electronics, and software programming. A prototype is designed to test and trial a new design to enhance precision by system analysts and users. Prototyping serves to provide specifications for a real, working system rather than a theoretical one.

Design and modeling

In many fields, there is great uncertainty as to whether a new design will actually do what is desired. New designs often have unexpected problems. A prototype is often used as part of the product design process to allow engineers and designers the ability to explore design alternatives, test theories and confirm performance prior to starting production of a new product. Engineers use their experience to tailor the prototype according to the specific unknowns still present in the intended design. For example, some prototypes are used to confirm and verify consumer interest in a proposed design whereas other prototypes will attempt to verify the performance or suitability of a specific design approach.

In general, an iterative series of prototypes will be designed, constructed and tested as the final design emerges and is prepared for production. With rare exceptions, multiple iterations of prototypes are used to progressively refine the design. A common strategy is to design, test, evaluate and then modify the design based on analysis of the prototype.

In many products it is common to assign the prototype iterations Greek letters. For example, a first iteration prototype may be called an "Alpha" prototype. Often this iteration is not expected to perform as intended and some amount of failures or issues are anticipated. Subsequent prototyping iterations (Beta, Gamma, etc.) will be expected to resolve issues and perform closer to the final production intent.

In many product development organizations, prototyping specialists are employed - individuals with specialized skills and training in general fabrication techniques that can help bridge between theoretical designs and the fabrication of prototypes.

Basic prototype categories

There is no general agreement on what constitutes a "prototype" and the word is often used interchangeably with the word "model" which can cause confusion. In general, "prototypes" fall into five basic categories:

Proof-of-Principle Prototype (Model) (in electronics sometimes built on a breadboard). A Proof of concept prototype is used to test some aspect of the intended design without attempting to exactly simulate the visual appearance, choice of materials or intended manufacturing process. Such prototypes can be used to "prove" out a potential design approach such as range of motion, mechanics, sensors, architecture, etc. These types of models are often used to identify which design options will not work, or where further development and testing is necessary.

Form Study Prototype (Model). This type of prototype will allow designers to explore the basic size, look and feel of a product without simulating the actual function or exact visual appearance of the product. They can help assess ergonomic factors and provide insight into visual aspects of the product's final form. Form Study Prototypes are often hand-carved or machined models from easily sculpted, inexpensive materials (e.g., urethane foam), without representing the intended color, finish, or texture. Due to the materials used, these models are intended for internal decision making and are generally not durable enough or suitable for use by representative users or consumers.

User Experience Prototype (Model). A User Experience Model invites active human interaction and is primarily used to support user focused research. While intentionally not addressing possible aesthetic treatments, this type of model does more accurately represent the overall size, proportions, interfaces, and articulation of a promising concept. This type of model allows early assessment of how a potential user interacts with various elements, motions, and actions of a concept which define the initial use scenario and overall user experience. As these models are fully intended to be used and handled, more robust construction is key. Materials typically include plywood, REN shape, RP processes and CNC machined components. Construction of user experience models is typically driven by preliminary CAID/CAD which may be constructed from scratch or with methods such as industrial CT scanning.

Visual Prototype (Model) will capture the intended design aesthetic and simulate the appearance, color and surface textures of the intended product but will not actually embody the function(s) of the final product. These models will be suitable for use in market research, executive reviews and approval, packaging mock-ups, and photo shoots for sales literature.

Functional Prototype (Model) (also called a working prototype) will, to the greatest extent practical, attempt to simulate the final design, aesthetics, materials and functionality of the intended design. The functional prototype may be reduced in size (scaled down) in order to reduce costs. The construction of a fully working full-scale prototype and the ultimate test of concept, is the engineers' final check for design flaws and allows last-minute improvements to be made before larger production runs are ordered.

Differences between a prototype and a production design

In general, prototypes will differ from the final production variant in three fundamental ways:

Materials. Production materials may require manufacturing processes involving higher capital costs than what is practical for prototyping. Instead, engineers or prototyping specialists will attempt to substitute materials with properties that simulate the intended final material.

Processes. Often expensive and time consuming unique tooling is required to fabricate a custom design. Prototypes will often compromise by using more variable processes, repeatable or controlled methods; substandard, inefficient, or substandard technology sources; or insufficient testing for technology maturity.

Lower fidelity. Final production designs often require extensive effort to capture high volume manufacturing detail. Such detail is generally unwarranted for prototypes as some refinement to the design is to be expected. Often prototypes are built using very limited engineering detail as compared to final production intent, which often uses statistical process controls and rigorous testing.

Characteristics and limitations of prototypes

Engineers and prototyping specialists seek to understand the limitations of prototypes to exactly simulate the characteristics of their intended design. A degree of skill and experience is necessary to effectively use prototyping as a design verification tool.

It is important to realize that by their very definition, prototypes will represent some compromise from the final production design. Due to differences in materials, processes and design fidelity, it is possible that a prototype may fail to perform acceptably whereas the production design may have been sound. A counter-intuitive idea is that prototypes may actually perform acceptably whereas the production design may be flawed since prototyping materials and processes may occasionally outperform their production counterparts.

In general, it can be expected that individual prototype costs will be substantially greater than the final production costs due to inefficiencies in materials and processes. Prototypes are also used to revise the design for the purposes of reducing costs through optimization and refinement.

It is possible to use prototype testing to reduce the risk that a design may not perform acceptably, however prototypes generally cannot eliminate all risk. There are pragmatic and practical limitations to the ability of a prototype to match the intended final performance of the product and some allowances and engineering judgement are often required before moving forward with a production design.

Building the full design is often expensive and can be time-consuming, especially when repeated several times—building the full design, figuring out what the problems are and how to solve them, then building another full design. As an alternative, "rapid-prototyping" or "rapid application development" techniques are used for the initial prototypes, which implement part, but not all, of the complete design. This allows designers and manufacturers to rapidly and inexpensively test the parts of the design that are most likely to have problems, solve those problems, and then build the full design.

This counter-intuitive idea —that the quickest way to build something is, first to build something else— is shared by scaffolding and the telescope rule.

Modern trends

With the recent advances in computer modeling it is becoming practical to eliminate the creation of a physical prototype (except possibly at greatly reduced scales for promotional purposes), instead modeling all aspects of the final product as a computer model. An example of such a development can be seen in Boeing 787 Dreamliner, in which the first full sized physical realization is made on the series production line. Computer modeling is now being extensively used in automotive design, both for form (in the styling and aerodynamics of the vehicle) and in function — especially for improving vehicle crashworthiness and in weight reduction to improve mileage.

Disadvantages of prototypingProducer might produce a system inadequate for overall organization needsUser can get too involved whereas the program can not be to a high standardStructure of system can be damaged since many changes could be madeProducer might get too attached to it (might cause legal involvement)[verification needed]Not suitable for large applicationsOver long periods, can cause loss in consumer interest and subsequent cancellation due to a lack of a market (for commercial products)May slow the development process, if there are large number of end users to satisfy.Advantages of prototypingMay provide the proof of concept necessary to attract fundingEarly visibility of the prototype gives users an idea of what the final system looks likeEncourages active participation among users and producerEnables a higher output for userCost effective (Development costs reduced).Increases system development speedAssists to identify any problems with the efficacy of earlier design, requirements analysis and coding activitiesHelps to refine the potential risks associated with the delivery of the system being developedVarious aspects can be tested and quicker feedback can be gained from the userHelps to deliver the product in quality easilyUser interaction available during development cycle of prototype

Mobile phone antenna remote shell Prototype design and production assembly plastic injection parts OEM

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